call us! 253-200-0300

HELP

Patient Resources

24 Hour
Referral Line:
1-253-200-0300

Medical History Form

Patient Admission Form

Courtesy Dosing Form

NWIH provides methadone at the following clinics:

  • 3727 South Tacoma Way, Tacoma, WA 98409 / Phone: 253-300-7474
  • 9720 South Tacoma Way, Lakewood, WA 98499 / Phone: 253-503-3666

Suboxone Copay Assistance

Vivitrol Copay Assistance & Providers

Washington Recovery Hotline: 1-866-789-1511

NA Meetings in Pierce County

AA Meetings in Pierce County

Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services Administration
(SAMHSA)

National Institute On Drug Abuse

Stop Overdose!

24 Hour Referral Line

253-200-0300

Hear the voices of hope from our patients and from providers who give hope to our patients.

Don't know where to start? Start with us...

For people experiencing SUD on opioids, there is hope! 

At NWIH, steps to recovery begin as soon as a patient decides to speak to one of our staff. Following the ASAM (American Society of Addiction Medicine) guidelines, our adept providers customize a treatment plan just for you. Initiation involves transitioning from your substance to a (MAT) Medication Assisted Treatment  with daily monitoring. Recovery involves periodic checkups of your physical, mental, and social health through counseling.

It’s a journey and we go along with you.

Here are voices of hope from our patients and from providers who give hope to our patients.

I love my job because I can see my hard work reflected in the fact that my clients are getting stronger and stronger.

I have been a recovery coach at NWIH since 2018. I assist patients in gaining all the skills and tools for survival which addiction might have destroyed or which a patient may never have had. I help patients open bank accounts, get bus passes and routes, shelter, housing, ID cards, food, clothing, telephones, insurance, and anything else a patient might need. I chose this job because I remember a time in my life when everyone I knew was using drugs in one way or another and because I have personally been touched by addiction.

A large fraction of my clients live in poverty and lack basic resources before and during their struggles with Substance Use Disorder (SUD). This is a major impediment to recovery from SUD.

Life is complicated, and I am willing to walk my clients through every small step of putting their lives together. If a patient lacks health insurance, I will refer the patient to NWIH’s intake coordinator to get insurance. If a patient needs peer counseling, mental health counseling, a free phone, or any other skill or tool imaginable, I will either provide it myself or communicate the need to someone at NWIH who can fill the need. I love my job because I can see my hard work reflected in the fact that my clients are getting stronger and stronger. I refer to my NWIH coworkers as “the dream team”. Working together, we can accomplish anything.

Reginald Blackman

Recovery Coach

I teach all of my patients that there is nothing morally or spiritually wrong with them...

I am a physician assistant at NWIH. Almost 20 years ago, when I began working as a physician assistant (PA), PAs mainly worked in underserved geographic areas. I found that Substance Use Disorder was unlimited in its geographic range and that people with these disorders were the most underserved population of any progressive illness. This, along with an innate desire to help, is why I chose to work in addiction medicine. I evaluate new and current clients, adjusting each patient’s treatment plan in collaboration with the patient.

A lot of my patients are discriminated against by family, friends, the legal system, employers, housing, and the healthcare system. The mistreatment which people with Substance Use Disorder (SUD) face can have SUD patients believing that they themselves are evil or broken.

I teach all of my patients that there is nothing morally or spiritually wrong with them, that they have a biochemical disease, and that they need to ask for help. When patients follow my advice and ask for help, I know that they are ready to recover. Then, I give each patient all the advice I can at every step of their journey.

Joseph Ference

Physician Assistant

I love my job because I can see my hard work reflected in the fact that my clients are getting stronger and stronger.

I have been a recovery coach at NWIH since 2018. I assist patients in gaining all the skills and tools for survival which addiction might have destroyed or which a patient may never have had. I help patients open bank accounts, get bus passes and routes, shelter, housing, ID cards, food, clothing, telephones, insurance, and anything else a patient might need. I chose this job because I remember a time in my life when everyone I knew was using drugs in one way or another and because I have personally been touched by addiction.

A large fraction of my clients live in poverty and lack basic resources before and during their struggles with Substance Use Disorder (SUD). This is a major impediment to recovery from SUD.

Life is complicated, and I am willing to walk my clients through every small step of putting their lives together. If a patient lacks health insurance, I will refer the patient to NWIH’s intake coordinator to get insurance. If a patient needs peer counseling, mental health counseling, a free phone, or any other skill or tool imaginable, I will either provide it myself or communicate the need to someone at NWIH who can fill the need. I love my job because I can see my hard work reflected in the fact that my clients are getting stronger and stronger. I refer to my NWIH coworkers as “the dream team”. Working together, we can accomplish anything.

Reginald Blackman

Recovery Coach

I teach all of my patients that there is nothing morally or spiritually wrong with them...

I am a physician assistant at NWIH. Almost 20 years ago, when I began working as a physician assistant (PA), PAs mainly worked in underserved geographic areas. I found that Substance Use Disorder was unlimited in its geographic range and that people with these disorders were the most underserved population of any progressive illness. This, along with an innate desire to help, is why I chose to work in addiction medicine. I evaluate new and current clients, adjusting each patient’s treatment plan in collaboration with the patient.

A lot of my patients are discriminated against by family, friends, the legal system, employers, housing, and the healthcare system. The mistreatment which people with Substance Use Disorder (SUD) face can have SUD patients believing that they themselves are evil or broken.

I teach all of my patients that there is nothing morally or spiritually wrong with them, that they have a biochemical disease, and that they need to ask for help. When patients follow my advice and ask for help, I know that they are ready to recover. Then, I give each patient all the advice I can at every step of their journey.

Joseph Ference

Physician Assistant